Services

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Services 2016-11-30T15:18:44+02:00

Signage

Signage, refers to the design or use of signs and symbols to communicate a message to a specific group, usually for the purpose of marketing or a kind of advocacy. A signage also means signs collectively or being considered as a group.

Signs

Signs are any kind of visual graphics created to display information to a particular audience. This is typically manifested in the form of wayfinding information in places such as streets or on the inside and outside of buildings. Signs vary in form and size based on location and intent, from more expansive banners, billboards, and murals, to smaller street signs, street name signs, sandwich boards and lawn signs. Newer signs may also use digital or electronic displays.

The main purpose of signs is to communicate, to convey information such that the receiver may make cognitive decisions based on the information provided. In general, signs may be classified according to the following functions:

  • Information: signs conveying information about services and facilities, such as maps, directories, or instructional signs.
  • Direction: signs showing the location of services, facilities, functional spaces and key areas, such as sign posts or directional arrows.
  • Identification: signs indicating services and facilities, such as room names and numbers, restroom signs, or floor designations.
  • Safety and Regulatory: signs giving warning or safety instructions, such as warning signs, traffic signs, exit signs, or signs conveying rules and regulations

Digital Printing

Printing at home, an office, or an engineering environment is subdivided into:

  • small format (up to ledger size paper sheets), as used in business offices and libraries
  • wide format (up to 3′ or 914mm wide rolls of paper), as used in drafting and design establishments.

Some of the more common printing technologies are:

  • blueprint – and related chemical technologies
  • daisy wheel – where pre-formed characters are applied individually
  • dot-matrix – which produces arbitrary patterns of dots with an array of printing studs
  • line printing – where formed characters are applied to the paper by lines
  • heat transfer – such as early fax machines or modern receipt printers that apply heat to special paper, which turns black to form the printed image
  • inkjet – including bubble-jet, where ink is sprayed onto the paper to create the desired image
  • electrophotography – where toner is attracted to a charged image and then developed
  • laser – a type of xerography where the charged image is written pixel by pixel using a laser
  • solid ink printer – where cubes of ink are melted to make ink or liquid toner

Vendors typically stress the total cost to operate the equipment, involving complex calculations that include all cost factors involved in the operation as well as the capital equipment costs, amortization, etc. For the most part, toner systems are more economical than inkjet in the long run, even though inkjets are less expensive in the initial purchase price.

Professional digital printing (using toner) primarily uses an electrical charge to transfer toner or liquid ink to the substrate onto which it is printed. Digital print quality has steadily improved from early color and black and white copiers to sophisticated colour digital presses such as the Xerox iGen3, the Kodak Nexpress, the HP Indigo Digital Press series, and the InfoPrint 5000. The iGen3 and Nexpress use toner particles and the Indigo uses liquid ink. The InfoPrint 5000 is a full-color, continuous forms inkjet drop-on-demand printing system. All handle variable data, and rival offset in quality. Digital offset presses are also called direct imaging presses, although these presses can receive computer files and automatically turn them into print-ready plates, they cannot insert variable data.

Small press and fanzines generally use digital printing. Prior to the introduction of cheap photocopying the use of machines such as the spirit duplicator, hectograph, and mimeograph was common.

Social Impact

Print gave a broader range of readers access to knowledge and enabled later generations to build directly on the intellectual achievements of earlier ones without the changes arising within verbal traditions. Print, according to Acton in his lecture On the Study of History (1895), gave “assurance that the work of the Renaissance would last, that what was written would be accessible to all, that such an occultation of knowledge and ideas as had depressed the Middle Ages would never recur, that not an idea would be lost”.

Print was instrumental in changing the nature of reading within society.

Elizabeth Eisenstein identifies two long-term effects of the invention of printing. She claims that print created a sustained and uniform reference for knowledge as well as allowing for comparison between incompatible views.